ISCSS 2014

Welcome | Program | Keynote lectures | Results | Committees

Welcome

In modern sports maximum utilization of individual capabilities and continuous high performance play an essential role. The demand for an accurate physiological and sociological screening among athletes is rapidly increasing.

The 21st International Congress on Sport Science for scientific program provides a unique multi-disciplinary perspective on significant and contemporary and important issues in sport and exercise. A wide range of sessions will be delivered in both interdisciplinary and single discipline format to provide critical thinking from professors and young scientists across the full spectrum of disciplines and professions involved in sport and exercise.

The 21th occasion will be celebrated with leading scientists, who will lecture on the opening day. The key-note lecture will be delivered by Dr. Catherine E. Casey (PhD) Associate Professor (Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, Faculty of Education University of Manitoba). She delivers a keynote address on the topic of School Physical Education systems in Canada and the United States.

Date of the Conference: 10-12th April, 2014.

Registration and abstract deadline: March 11, 2014

Presentations

The Scientific Committee of the Congress invites papers in the following fields:

Program

Thursday, 10 April 2014

Friday, 11 April 2014

Saturday, 12 April 2014

Detailed program of the sections

Full brochure of the congress (PDF, 53 pages) >>>

Human Kinesiology & Physical Exercise Therapy (Chair: Dr. Karsten Froberg | Members: Dr. Rudolf Mihalik, Dr. Anikó Pósa) (Main Building, Room 40)

Opening presentation: Zoltán Heckel: Muscle damage and recovery following two weeks of eccentric-concentric knee extensor training in young versus old humans (Ph.D. Student)

  1. Bartha Kincső: Influence of muscle activation level and stored elastic energy on positive mechanical work
  2. Mariann Mravcsik: Co-activation of flexor-extensor muscle pairs during cycling arm movements
  3. Gábor Montvai, Péter Kőrösi: The effect of homologous muscle stretching on the regulation of contralateral muscle contraction
  4. Tamás Dobronyi, Julianna Király: The Evaluation of Familiarization for Bicycle Ergometer in Anaerobic Tests

Exercise Physiology (Chair: Dr. Dong-Ho Han | Members: Dr. Higuchi Mitsuru, Dr. Andor Molnár) (Main Building, Room 40)

  1. Lise Søndergård Thomsen: Effect of whey protein hydrolysate on adaptation to endurance training in well-trained runners
  2. Anne Kær Thorsen: Acute effects of aerobic exercise on inhibitory control and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in young adults aged 16-19 years: preliminary results
  3. Szabó E, Szénási N.: Comparsion of blood and saliva lactate concentration and its modifications by physiological parameters
  4. Ágnes Takács, Zsófia Réka Nagy: Carbohydrate sensing in the human mouth: effects on exercise performance and brain activity
  5. Laura Bas: Physiological Adaptation of the Heart in Hungarian National Single Canoe and Kayak Athletes
  6. Anna Tüske: Age dependence aerobic capacity among young and middle age male
  7. Hirokazu Taniguchi: Is irisin really an exercise-induced myokine?

Social Sciences and Sport Management (Chair: Dr. Gyöngyi Szabó Földesiné | Members: Dr. Gábor Géczi, Dr. Melinda Bíró) (Main Building, Room 40)

Opening presentation: Bálint Dolnego: The Football Referee Academy’s Team’s Longitudinal Study of Physical Preparedness (PhD student)

  1. Veronika Vojtkó: Change of African American Participation in Modern Summer Olympic Games
  2. Lilla Németh, Bence Bagó: Traditional but unpopular – The social representation of fencing and its impact on choosing among sports
  3. Brigitta Fanni Hegyi: Motivational background of professional athletes’ tattoos
  4. Vivien Váczi, Bence Bagó: „Why did you give up?” – Narrative approach of fencers’dropout
  5. László Mohácsi, Norbert Gura: Organizational culture and leadership behaviour among professional and amateur basketball and football organizations
  6. Zsombor Zilinyi: The impact of the youth European Championships on basketball players sports career
  7. Dóra Almási: Leadership efficiency research on Southern Plains teams
  8. Krisztina Tóth, Kornél Boros, Erika Boros: Presence of eating disorders among female handball players and aesthetic sport competitors
  9. Zsolt Ákos Jozefiák: Resting alpha brain-wave activity in male athletes: comparison with HRV values and cognitive performance

Physical Activity in School and during Recreational Time (Chair: Dr. Caterina Casey | Members: Dr. László Balogh, Dr. Zsolt Murlasits) (Main Building, Room 37)

Opening presentation: Nikoletta Nagy, Peter Szajer: Study of motivation of the leasure time swimmers

  1. Tamás Csörgő: Effects Of Massage Therapies On Women Over Sixty Years
  2. Marcell Mikolai: Friluftsliv forever / Develop Koppány Valley areas by Frilftsliv parks
  3. Ágnes Badár: Sauna as a way of effective leisuretime activity
  4. Gergő Gabnai, Aaron Fischer: Research on Young People’s Leisure around the World
  5. Anna Szabó: Role and movement quality imagery as a facilitator of flow for dancers
  6. Bence Török: Comparsion of the Physical Education and Interscholastic Sport System in the USA and in Hungary
  7. Gábor Horváth: The acknowledgement of Physical Education teachers, peer support and healthy lifestyle
  8. Jakob Tarp: Associations between objectively measured physical activity levels and executive functions in Danish 12-14 year old adolescents – baseline findings from the Learning, Cognition and Motion (LCoMotion) cluster-randomized controlled trial
  9. Fanni Sipos, Dóra Vilhelm: Relationship between the objectively measured physical activity in school and FMS scores

Motor Learning (Chair: Dr. József Tihanyi | Members: Dr. Miklós Bánhidi, Zoltán Marczinka) (Main Building, Room 40)

  1. Gergely, Kiss: New distance, new perspective in education of the canoe technique
  2. Zsolt Kisszékelyi: Developing karate techniques through gymnastics skills
  3. Motoki Inoue: The study of Shooting play of pivot players in Handball
  4. Maiko Nakahara,  Hiroshi Aida: Characteristics of the center back player’s attacking-play in Handball
  5. Yuki ItoHajime Fujimoto, Eiko Yamada: World top-level men center back players scoring ability in handball  – Focusing on two players, Nikola Karabatic and Dalibor Doder
  6. Márton Bognár: Exemination of a Hungarian Elite Football Academy Players’ Conditional Abilities
  7. Arnold Nagy: The exercise intensity of Hungarian A-level motocross athletes

Human Kinesiology & Exercise Physiology for PhD students (Chair: Dr. Bert Taylor | Members: Dr. Higashida Higuchi, Dr. István Berkes) (Main Building, Room 40)

  1. Renáta Szabó: The effect of recreational exercise, caloric restriction, and high triglyceride diet in experimental menopause
  2. Éva Boros: The expression profile of TAM and NLR receptors upon physical activity in TNBS-induced colitis in rats
  3. Gergő Pintér: Enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation and amino acid level in smokers and non-smokers after a 6-week long β-alanine rich diet
  4. Alexandra Cselkó: Performance Changes of Prepubertal female handball players after 8 weeks of aerobic training
  5. Melitta Pajk: Training-Induced Differences In Mitochondrial Biogenesis In Rat Testicular Tissue
  6. Takamasa Tsuzuki: Changes in stress protein expression in skeletal muscle before the onset of metabolic abnormalities in type 2 diabetic rats
  7. Ryoko Kawakami , Susumu S. Sawada, Munehiro Matsushita, Takashi Okamoto, Koji Tsukamoto: Dynapenic Abdominal Obesity and the Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study among Japanese Men (poster)
  8. Elisa Grazioli: Physical Activity And Cancer Survivors: A Combined Training Protocol (poster)

Keynote lectures

Dr. Csaba Nyakas (Research Institute of Sport Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary): Life-long exercise and the functional cognitive capacity of the brain

Exercise physiology and exercise medicine by nature serve prevention, rehabilitation, and also healthy aging which is becoming a rapidly demanding need. To increase functional capacity of the brain in aged individuals long-term exercise and sport of moderate intensity merit consideration. Using animal model, the life-long (L-L) moderate intensity exercise training was introduced from young adult age and kept regularly up to 24 months of age (the human equivalent of that age is around 70 years). At the old age of 24 months cognitive functions like attention and spatial learning were studied. As the background brain functional reserve the cholinergic brain, neurotrophic factors (BDNF), neurogenesis and the markers of neuronal bioenergy capacity (glucose transporter 1, MAPK and Akt phosphorylation) were followed. The results showed that the L-L exercise improved attention and spatial learning, attenuated the decline of hippocampal cholinergic capability and also that of neurogenesis. The concentration of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increased, and the expression of capillary glucose transporter 1 did the same in the hippocampus. MAPK and Akt phosphorylation markedly enhanced. Thus, the most support of L-L exercise could be obtained in the energetic cellular reserve of neurons of aged rats compared to the sedentary controls. The concept is supported that continuous exercise preferably throughout the entire lifespan is preventive and supportive on the healthy brain aging condition.

Dr. Dong-Ho Han (Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Sciences, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, USA): Endurance Exercise Induces Rapid Decreases in Glycogenolytic/Glycolytic Enzymes in Skeletal Muscle

Dr. Kazuhiko Higashida1, Dr. Mitsuru Higuchi1, 2 (1Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Japan 2 Institute of Advanced Active Aging Research, Japan): Effect of exercise training on lipid droplet-associated proteins in skeletal muscle

Fat is one of the main fuel for producing ATP in skeletal muscle during endurance exercise. Although most of fat in the body is stored in subcutaneous and abdominal adipose tissue, small amount of fat is also stored in skeletal muscle as lipid droplet.  Endurance exercise training increases lipolytic capacity and fat utilization in skeletal muscles. This adaptation results from upregulation of proteins involved in lipolysis, such as adipose triglycerol lipase (ATGL), hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and perilipin 5.  However, the molecular mechanisms of how exercise modulates lipid-associated proteins are unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying endurance exercise-induced lipid-associated proteins in rat skeletal muscles.  A bout of 3-h swimming exercise increased lipid-associated proteins (ATGL, HSL and perilipin 5) in rat epitrochlearis muscle.  However, there was no significant increase in these proteins in soleus muscle.  Phospho-AMPK protein content in epitrochlearis muscle significantly increased immediately after swimming exercise, but not in soleus muscle. These results led us to hypothesize that AMPK is involved in exercise-induced increases in lipid droplet-associated proteins in skeletal muscle.  Incubation with 0.5 mM 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, an AMPK activator, for 6 h significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of lipid droplet-associated proteins in epitrochlearis muscle.  Finally, we examined the effect of very high intensity exercise training on lipid droplet-associated proteins in skeletal muscle, since high intensity exercise has a greater effect on AMPK activation than endurance exercise.  Consequently, we found that short (only 280 s), extremely high intensity exercise training induces expressions of ATGL, HSL and perilipin 5 protein in skeletal muscle to a level comparable to that attained after 3-h endurance training.  These results suggest that activation of AMPK is involved in exercise-induced increases in lipid droplet-associated proteins in skeletal muscle.

Dr. Mitsuru Higuchi1, 2, Dr. Kumpei Tanisawa3 (1Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, 2Institute of Advanced Active Aging Research, Waseda University, 3Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Waseda University): Effects of polygenic risk and aerobic fitness level on metabolic profile in Japanese men

Adverse metabolic profiles such as blood lipid abnormality, impaired glucose tolerance, and abdominal obesity increases the risk for cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. Individual variability of the metabolic profiles are determined by a combination of several genetic factors, while high cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is associated with favorable metabolic profiles and reduced risk for various metabolic diseases. However, it remains unknown whether physically active individuals can reduce their genetic risk for adverse metabolic profiles. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the relationship between genetic factors and the metabolic profiles differ by age. We therefore performed a cross-sectional study to determine whether CRF and aging modify the relationships between polygenic risk and the metabolic profiles. CRF was assessed by measuring maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in 181 Japanese men (age, 20–79 years), and subjects were divided into low and high CRF groups according to the measured VO2max values. We genotyped the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously identified to be associated with blood lipid levels, glucose tolerance and body mass index (BMI) in the recent genome-wide association studies. Based on these SNPs, genetic risk scores (GRSs) for each trait were calculated by adding the number of risk alleles, and subjects were divided into the low, middle and high GRS groups. Two-way analysis of covariance (GRS × CRF or age) revealed that serum triglyceride levels of low CRF individuals were higher in the high and middle GRS groups than in the low GRS group, whereas no differences were detected in the triglyceride levels of high CRF individuals among the GRS groups. In contrast to blood lipid levels, there was no significant interaction effect between GRS and CRF on glucose metabolism; individuals with higher GRS had higher HbA1c and lower β-cell function than the individuals with lower GRS regardless of the CRF levels. Furthermore, several indicators of body fatness such as BMI, total abdominal fat area and visceral fat area were higher in the high GRS group than in the low GRS group only in the middle-aged individuals, whereas these indicators were not different between the GRS groups in the elderly. These results suggest that the relationship between polygenic risk and the metabolic profiles can be modified by CRF and age.

Dr. Catherine E. Casey (Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, Faculty of Education University of Manitoba, Canada): Physical Education systems in Canada and the United States

The focus of the presentation is to highlight important aspects of University/College PE programs in both Canada and the United States. Although this is not intended to be a comparison of the two systems, there are places of intersect that will be explored. What is of note and certainly a point of disconnect between the two countries is the definition of a “qualified” PE teacher. In Canada, one must attain an undergraduate degree prior to application for a Teacher Education program. One must have successfully attended a Teacher Education Program prior to receiving a teaching certificate. One is not permitted to teach without this certification. This is not always the case in the United States and this will be further explored during the presentation.

The evolution of university Physical Education, Kinesiology and Teacher Education programs in both Canada and the United States has been circuitous. Over the past thirty years, we have seen these programs grow and develop into, although narrow in scope, highly specialized and in some cases, prescriptive programs. Kinesiology is an important part of this evolution as it represents a splinter group from the original stand-alone Physical Education program. Today it stands very much on its own and has taken much of the spotlight away from Physical Education. This is especially true at the graduate level in Canadian PE Faculties where enrolment numbers continue to decrease.

Dr. Bert Taylor (University of Western Ontario, Canada): The effects of exercise on the major diseases of aging

Until recently the concept of reaching old age referred to relatively few individuals. As early as 100 years ago the average life span was about 50 years in most industrialized countries, whereas today it approximates 80 years. Medical science and, in particular, exercise scientists utilizing specific training programs for older adults, have made attaining even 100 years of age, no longer a rarity. In fact, in North America and western Europe, the fastest growing population cohort is the group over 85 years of age.

Exercise has been found, generally, to ameliorate the debilitating effects of the aging process. All of the major diseases of aging appear to be positively and beneficially affected by exercise. Exercise  alleviates many of the symptoms of cardiovascular disease, Type II diabetes, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, Alzheimer’s Disease, and even certain types of cancer.

In most countries, few physicians have any formal training in exercise prescription. The formulation of exercise programs for the aging population can be a complex task, due to the nature of the aging process, and should be left to Kinesiologists and Physical Educators. In North America seniors are being cared for by health care teams, which include these highly trained exercise specialists.

Exercise may not be the panacea of all the problems of the aging population but it has been scientifically shown to be a great beneficial aid for healthy aging and improved quality of life for seniors. Exercise, importantly, is also a means to alleviate the ever increasing costs of the health care systems.

Results

Human Kinesiology & Physical Exercise Therapy (Chair: Dr. Karsten Froberg | Members: Dr. Rudolf Mihalik, Dr. Anikó Pósa)

  1. Bartha Kincső: Influence of muscle activation level and stored elastic energy on positive mechanical work
  2. Tamás Dobronyi, Julianna Király: The Evaluation of Familiarization for Bicycle Ergometer in Anaerobic Tests

Exercise Physiology (Chair: Dr. Dong-Ho Han | Members: Dr. Higuchi Mitsuru, Dr. Andor Molnár)

  1. Anne Kær Thorsen: Acute effects of aerobic exercise on inhibitory control and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in young adults aged 16-19 years: preliminary results
  2. Laura Bas: Physiological Adaptation of the Heart in Hungarian National Single Canoe and Kayak Athletes
  3. Lise Søndergård Thomsen: Effect of whey protein hydrolysate on adaptation to endurance training in well-trained runners

Social Sciences and Sport Management (Chair: Dr. Gyöngyi Szabó Földesiné | Members: Dr. Gábor Géczi, Dr. Melinda Bíró)

  1. Vivien Váczi, Bence Bagó: „Why did you give up?” – Narrative approach of fencers’dropout
  2. Krisztina Tóth, Kornél Boros, Erika Boros: Presence of eating disorders among female handball players and aesthetic sport competitors | László Mohácsi, Norbert Gura: Organizational culture and leadership behaviour among professional and amateur basketball and football organizations
  3. Veronika Vojtkó: Change of African American Participation in Modern Summer Olympic Games | Zsombor Zilinyi: The impact of the youth European Championships on basketball players sports career

Special award: Zsolt Ákos Jozefiák: Resting alpha brain-wave activity in male athletes: comparison with HRV values and cognitive performance

Physical Activity in School and during Recreational Time (Chair: Dr. Caterina Casey | Members: Dr. László Balogh, Dr. Zsolt Murlasits)

  1. Jakob Tarp: Associations between objectively measured physical activity levels and executive functions in Danish 12-14 year old adolescents – baseline findings from the Learning, Cognition and Motion (LCoMotion) cluster-randomized controlled trial
  2. Anna Szabó: Role and movement quality imagery as a facilitator of flow for dancers
  3. Gergő Gabnai, Aaron Fischer: Research on Young People’s Leisure around the World

Special award: Ágnes Badár: Sauna as a way of effective leisuretime activity | Fanni Sipos, Dóra Vilhelm: Relationship between the objectively measured physical activity in school and FMS scores

Motor Learning (Chair: Dr. József Tihanyi | Members: Dr. Miklós Bánhidi, Zoltán Marczinka)

  1. Arnold Nagy: The exercise intensity of Hungarian A-level motocross athletes
  2. Zsolt Kisszékelyi: Developing karate techniques through gymnastics skills
  3. Motoki Inoue: The study of Shooting play of pivot players in Handball

Human Kinesiology & Exercise Physiology for PhD students (Chair: Dr. Bert Taylor | Members: Dr. Higashida Higuchi, Dr. István Berkes)

1. Takamasa Tsuzuki: Changes in stress protein expression in skeletal muscle before the onset of metabolic abnormalities in type 2 diabetic rats | Melitta Pajk: Training-Induced Differences In Mitochondrial Biogenesis In Rat Testicular Tissue
3. Éva Boros: The expression profile of TAM and NLR receptors upon physical activity in TNBS-induced colitis in rats

Committees

Organizing Committee

Scientific Committee

1 March 2017 (modified: 30 May 2021)

Projects

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